Difference between revisions of "Attack Iran, Ignore the Constitution"

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{{item
{{Item
|author=Jeremy Brecher
|author=Jeremy Brecher, Brendan Smith
|source=The Nation
|source=The Nation
|date=April 21, 2006
|url=http://www.thenation.com/doc/20060508/attack_iran
|url=http://www.thenation.com/doc/20060508/attack_iran
|date=April 21, 2006
|quote="But the Bush doctrine of pre-emptive war, as laid out in the 2002 National Security Strategy of the United States and reiterated in 2006, claims for the President the power to attack other countries--like Iran--simply because he asserts they pose a threat. It thereby removes the decision of war and peace from Congress and gives it the President. It is, as Senator Robert Byrd put it, 'unconstitutional on its face.'"
|quote="But the Bush doctrine of pre-emptive war, as laid out in the 2002 National Security Strategy of the United States and reiterated in 2006, claims for the President the power to attack other countries--like Iran--simply because he asserts they pose a threat. It thereby removes the decision of war and peace from Congress and gives it the President. It is, as Senator Robert Byrd put it, 'unconstitutional on its face.'"}}
}}
 
{{Opinion|Iranian nuclear crisis|United States should attack Iran|against}}
{{additional_author|Brendan Smith}}
 
{{opinion|Iranian nuclear crisis|United States should attack Iran|against}}

Latest revision as of 20:20, February 3, 2008

This is an opinion item.

Author(s) Jeremy Brecher, Brendan Smith
Source The Nation
Date April 21, 2006
URL http://www.thenation.com/doc/20060508/attack_iran
Quote
Quotes-start.png "But the Bush doctrine of pre-emptive war, as laid out in the 2002 National Security Strategy of the United States and reiterated in 2006, claims for the President the power to attack other countries--like Iran--simply because he asserts they pose a threat. It thereby removes the decision of war and peace from Congress and gives it the President. It is, as Senator Robert Byrd put it, 'unconstitutional on its face.'" Quotes-end.png


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This item argues against the position United States should attack Iran on the topic Iranian nuclear crisis.